How to Make the Softest Baby Quilt in the World

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #quiltbindingtutorial

If you’re interested in making the softest baby quilt in the world, you have come to the right place. Think of this post as a recipe, full of the best ingredients and tips; however, instead of always finishing with the same dish, you can apply these rules to any quilt!

In my example I used the Fishing Net quilt pattern. I’ve always thought that this pattern looked like a present tied with a beautiful ribbon. I knew this design would be perfect when I got a very special request from a mother in need.

A few weeks ago I received an email from a mom with twin 18-month old girls. One of the girls was very sick and needed to spend a lot of time in the hospital. The mother desperately wanted a quilt that was soft and cozy for her little one to snuggle. She didn't request specific colors or a certain pattern. For her, the top priority was cuddle-ability.

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #doublegauze

I knew that to make the softest baby quilt in the world I would need to source the dreamiest materials, pick the perfect quilt pattern, and finish it using specific sewing techniques. Oh! And there was one more catch – since the little girl receiving this quilt was going in and out of the hospital, this quilt would get washed – A LOT. That means it needed to be able to hold up under repeated washing and drying.

Was I up for the challenge? Can I make the softest baby quilt in the world? You bet!

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The Recipe for the Softest Baby Quit in the World


#1: The Softest Fabric

To make a creamy, dreamy, silky smooth quilt, we first must pick the right materials. Even though lightweight quilting cotton is the most common fabric used when making a baby quilt, I knew that I could find something softer.

Through writing about many different kinds of fabric in our Quilty Adventure, I discovered the sweet, delicate wonders of double gauze. Read more about the origins and special features of double gauze here – How to Sew with Double Gauze.

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquilt #doublegauze

Even though double gauze is very different than the quilting cotton you've probably been using, the same basic sewing rules still apply.

  • Prewash. Air fluff or tumble dry on low heat until the fabric is mostly dry.
  • Before it’s fully dry, spray starch all over the double gauze and iron using the cotton setting.
  • Use a new needle (your standard piecing needle will work just fine). I suggest using a new needle because a dull one risks the chance of snagging the double gauze. You’ll discover after working with this stuff that it snags and frays much more easily than regular quilting cotton.
  • Bump your stitch length up. I typically piece with a stitch length of 2.5. When piecing double gauze I take that up to 3. Anything between 3-4 would be ideal.
  • Use 50 wt. thread. A lighter thread works best with this semi-delicate fabric.

My Fishing Net Fabric

Why wool batting makes the warmest quilts! Learn how to quilt with this beautifully fluffy and sustainable fiber. suzyquilts.com #babyquilt #quilttutorial

#2: The Right Quilt Pattern

This point is a bit vague, but when working with double gauze not every quilt pattern will work well. Find a quilt pattern than doesn't use lots of tiny blocks. Larger strips and pieces work great. The more you cut and handle double gauze, the more chance it has to fray.

Some great SQ patterns to make in double gauze include:

#3: The Fluffiest Batting

It's no secret that I love, love, LOVE wool batting! In fact, I just wrote a whole blog post on the wonders of wool batting, so read more here - Why Wool Batting Makes the Warmest Quilts.

Not only does wool batting give the impression of a fluffy puff marshmallow, it's also deliciously warm. Check out this post for a full tutorial on How to Baste a Quilt!

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #nurseryinspo

After pin basting, I use my scissors to trim the batting and backing down so they are about 2" larger than the top. Having a lot of excess stuff going through my sewing machine makes quilting harder, but I also want to give myself enough wiggle room for the layers to shift, should that happen.

Why wool batting makes the warmest quilts! Learn how to quilt with this beautifully fluffy and sustainable fiber. suzyquilts.com #babyquilt #quilttutorial
How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #modernquiltpattern #quiltingtutorial

#4: Loose Quilting

We've got the dream team of ingredients – double gauze and wool batting, let's allow them to shine. To keep that wonderful puff and to minimize the feeling of thread over soft fabric, I kept it simple and quilted in the ditch.

The term "stitch in the ditch" refers to quilting in or close to the pieced seams of the quilt. This loose quilting was just the finishing touch to maintain its self-proclaimed title of softest baby quilt in the world!

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #nurseryinspo
How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #quiltbinding
How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #nurseryinspo
How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquilt #doublegauze
How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #quiltbindingtutorial

Binding Tip!

As you can see in the photos, wool batting is thicker and puffier than a lot of other battings. Because of this, I cut my binding strips extra wide so I would be sure to neatly cover the edges. Rather than my typical 2 ¼" strips, I cut these 2 ⅝". 

The mariner cloth I used is a bit thick and also has a tendency to fray. With a different fabric, 2 ½" strips probably would have been fine, but I wanted to be on the safe side.

You May Also Like...

The more I fall in love with double gauze, the more I realize many quilt shops don't carry it. I bought all of the fabric used in my baby quilt at fabric.com, but there are some other great options on the web too.

  1. Miss Matatabi Japanese Fabric - the best selection of Nani Iro double gauze
  2. Fabricworm
  3. Gauze Fabric Store
  4. Spoonflower - print any design on their soft organic Sweet Pea Gauze

Have you quilted with double gauze? Tell us your tips and where you like to buy it in the comments! 

How to make the softest baby quilt in the world! The answer is to quilt with double gauze and wool batting – a sewing tutorial on how to do both! suzyquilts.com #babyquiltpattern #quiltbindingtutorial

36 thoughts on “How to Make the Softest Baby Quilt in the World

  1. Nikki says:

    I have used the double gauze and wool combo and it is dreamy! I got my materials at our local Portland treasure Fabric Depot which has since closed. I just wanted to say yes to more natural batting and dont worry about baby allergies, it will be fine! Also whole cloth quilts in double gauze, especially a fun print, are super snuggly too!!

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      Great question! I went a smidge wider. I still cut my pieces the same, so the result was a slightly smaller quilt. If you are up for doing a bit of math, you could convert the seam allowance to 1/2″ instead of 1/4″. That would guaranty really safe seams.

  2. Liza Azman says:

    Thank you for sharing everything about the quilt. I am a newbie and just love to read and absorb all information from your blog. Unfortunately for us here in Malaysia, everything is expensive and all material especially batting and fabrics are imported from all over the world! 😣

  3. Laura Clancy says:

    I’d love to make one of these. I’m a little hesitant though after reading some of the comments about the wool bearding. I’m wondering why this would happen to one person but not the other. Is there an alternate batting that will make the quilt just as soft and drapey?

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      I’ve never had a problem with Quilters Dream wool batting bearding, but if you’d like to avoid it all together, bamboo batting is wonderfully soft and drapey, just a lot thinner. You can read more about that here – https://suzyquilts.com/why-bamboo-batting-makes-the-perfect-summer-quilt/

      Another option to consider is Quilters Dream Puff. It is very similar to Dream Wool in loft, but because it is made of synthetic materials it doesn’t beard.

    • Jackson M. Watkins says:

      I love babies and kids, and most of the quilts that I have made have been made for “the little people”. I work with my local chapter of “Quilts For Kids”. BUT, I have read lots on double gauge in the past year and love everything I have heard about it. My point is, heck with the kids, unless of course they are sick and need something really soft and special. I’m planning to make a King size bed quilt for my husband and myself using Batiks on the top and Double Gauge for the backing. I do have one question for you. I have terrible neurology in my feet and legs which prevents me from sleeping under a heavy quilt. What type of batting would you suggest that would be both warm and lightweight? Thanks so much.

      • Rebecca Smith says:

        Honestly, the wool is lovely for a super warm quilt without a lot of weight. I think it would be the perfect option for you!

  4. Janequiltsslowly says:

    I sleep under a wool batting quilt in winter & summer. I think it’s the absolute best. Quilting stitches show up so well on wool. I am going to try double gauze for the next baby quilt I make! Thanks for the tips.

  5. Lou Ann says:

    Beautiful story and wonderful gift to a hurting mom and family. What impresses me most is the story behind how it came to be. However, it’s great to know how to make a supper soft blanket. I would have never tried that fabric. Thank you for the information. I am going to keep this in mind for the baby quilts I make to sell.

  6. Beverley says:

    I hope that the little one will do well in her treatments. Our prayers go out to her. I never thought of double gauge for quilting. I’m presently make a quilt for my grandson, who told he wanted it to soft. I think that I’ll try the double gauge for the backing. Thanks for the tips.

  7. Ashley says:

    I just love this idea. Bless that sweet baby and her family ❤️. I saved all my gauze receiving blankets from all my babies for a memory quilt for myself someday. I will be using this post!

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      You will experience a bit of shrinkage and puckering with the first wash, even if you prewashed your fabric, but wool is incredibly durable and as long as you wash and dry them gently these quilts hold up great!

  8. Karen says:

    Gorgeous! Thank you for your kindness, as a nurse and volunteer to families of sick children any comfort given to both children and parents is so welcomed. Mum is probably getting as much comfort from your quilt as her little girl. Best wishes to this family xx

  9. Linda says:

    I’ve made a couple of whole cloth double gauze quilts but used a high quality Robert Kaufman flannel as the batting with the idea that they will be super lightweight and soft — good for “grab and go” in the stroller and for use in warmer weather.

  10. Blaiwesk says:

    Does the term double guaze go by any other name? Kona cotton looks a bit like those pictures but may it’s more tightly woven?

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      Robert Kaufman Kona cotton is different than double gauze. Kona is a lightweight quilting cotton, however the brand Robert Kaufman makes double gauze. That’s actually what I used to make these quilts. Sometimes double gauze is called just “gauze.”

  11. Miriam says:

    Okay, two things. Nope, three things:
    1. I LOVE LOVE LOVE these muted colors with the muted+neon backing with neon mariners cloth. It’s like the yummiest math.
    2. Am I missing something about stitching in the ditch? Quilters seem to see it as the easy way to quilt, but I can never stay totally in the ditch and always stray up into my fabric.
    3. I was hunting down some Nani Iro after reading this, and I found some pre-quilted double gauze. What fun can I have with that?!

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      Stitching in the ditch is a simple way to quilt, but in no way easy. Straying out of the ditch is almost inevitable, so don’t worry too much about it 😉 I’ve seen that pre-quilted gauze! How fun!

  12. Kay Saunders says:

    Love this, thank you Suzy. I am having trouble sourcing the double gauze at my local fabric outlets – is muslin the same as double gauze?

    • Suzy Quilts says:

      Muslin is very similar to light-weight quilting cotton. Double gauze has a much different feel. You know it’s double gauze if it is literally two pieces of gauze that you can pull apart.

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